sweet flag grass

Divide Japanese sweet flag grass in spring every three or four years. Otherwise, growing sweet flag grass is nearly effortless. is a perennial aquatic plant with sword-like leaves that resemble those of iris. Leaf scorch can occur if the soil is not consistently moist or wet. It doesn’t take much effort when growing sweet flag grass. The term flag derives from the Middle English word flagge, meaning "reed.". Acorus gramineus, commonly known as Japanese sweet flag, Japanese rush, grassy-leaved sweet flag, and grass-leaf sweet flag, is a botanical species belonging to the genus Acorus, native to Japan, Korea, and eastern Asia. It may not be statuesque, but the golden-yellow grass provides plenty of bright color in nearly any area where its moisture requirements are met. The small divisions can be planted in small pots to mature for a year or so before transplanting them into permanent garden locations. Japanese sweet flag, also known as Calamus, is native to Japan and China. Small greenish-yellow flowers appear on spikes in spring and early summer, followed by red berries. Where this is a concern, growing it in submerged containers can be the best strategy. Sweet flag and wormwood were spread on the roofs of houses for decoration and to ward off evil spirits. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Acorus_gramineus&oldid=960250085, Plants used in traditional Chinese medicine, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 1 June 2020, at 23:07. Read on for more information about Japanese sweet flag. Average soil is fine, but be sure the soil is consistently moist, as sweet flag doesn’t tolerate bone dry soil and may scorch. When separating from the mother plant, be sure to get a decent-size rhizome with the separated portion. Leaves can brown at the edges in cold winter weather. The plant also goes by the common names of sweet flag and calamus. 'Variegatus' is variegated with cream stripes. Learn tips for creating your most beautiful (and bountiful) garden ever. Miniature greenish-yellow blooms appear on spikes in spring and early summer, followed by tiny red berries. Native to hot, humid climates of Asia, Japanese sweet flag grass can tolerate the heat and humidity in any U.S. region; dryness is another matter. Japanese sweet flag is a striking aquatic plant that tops out at about 12 inches. This plant is a good choice for stabilizing damp areas prone to erosion, such as the banks along creeks or landscape ponds. is a perennial aquatic plant with sword-like leaves that resemble those of iris. Sweet flag is hardy to USDA plant hardiness zones 6 through 9, although some Acorus sweet flag info indicates the plant is tough enough for zones 5 through 11. Similarly, the leaf tips may turn brown in periods of extreme cold. Japanese sweet flag grass (Acorus spp.) This water-loving plant also likes a fair amount of sun. It can be propagated by dividing the fleshy underwater rhizome and planting the base in shallow water. Plants spread just below the surface but are not invasive and are easily moved if necessary. If the plants are not growing at water's edge, water as needed to keep the soil moist. Japanese sweet flag grass is a nearly effortless landscape plant to grow. To grow sweet flag in a pond or other standing water, place the plant in a container and set it in water less than 4 inches deep. Sweet flag plant benefits from division in spring every three or four years. Native to Japan and China, Acorus generally grows in USDA hardiness zones 6 to 9, with a few cultivars appropriate as far north as zones 4 and as far south as zone 11. Sweet flag plants tolerate light shade or full sun, although the plant benefits from afternoon shade in hot climates. When growing Japanese sweet flag directly in a pond or other standing water, first place the plant in a container, then set it in water less than 4 inches deep. It is not important that the soil is well-drained. Introducing "One Thing": A New Video Series, The Spruce Gardening & Plant Care Review Board, The Spruce Renovations and Repair Review Board, Japanese sweet flag grass, sweet flag, calamus, 3 inches to 3 feet tall and 6 inches to 2 feet wide. Despite its common name, Japanese sweet flag grass is not an ornamental grass but instead is a perennial that spreads by underground rhizomes. The plant may not be statuesque, but the golden-yellow grass provides plenty of bright color in soggy garden spots, along streams or pond edges, in semi-shady woodland gardens – or nearly any area where the plant’s moisture requirements are met. Plant it in full sun to partial shade, in a location that is moist to constantly wet. Read more articles about Sweet Flag Grass. The grassy leaves emit a sweet, rather spicy aroma when crushed or stepped on. It grows well in full to part shade, but more sun usually means that the soil needs more water to prevent it from drying out. The tallest Japanese sweet flag grasses top out at about 39 inches in height, while the smallest dwarf cultivars can be as short as 3 inches. It is a good choice for stabilizing the soil in damp, erosion-prone soil. This shrubby plant's long, narrow, slightly curved leaves may grow to 30 cm (12 inches) in height. Despite its common name, Japanese sweet flag grass is not an ornamental grass but instead is a perennial that spreads by underground rhizomes. Find more gardening information on Gardening Know How: Keep up to date with all that's happening in and around the garden. But as long as the plant gets enough water, they will do fine. Sign up for our newsletter. Leaf scorch is an indication of too little water. Acorus gramineus spreads aggressively by rhizome, creating a nearly-seamless groundcover where conditions are favorable, and it is frequently used around the edges of ponds and water gardens,[2] as well as submerged in freshwater aquaria. The species is slow-growing but often needs to be controlled (usually through division) over time, to prevent excessive spread. By: Mary H. Dyer, Credentialed Garden Writer. This is one of the rare garden plants that has no serious insect or disease problems. Japanese sweet flag (Acorus gramineus) is a striking little aquatic plant that tops out at about 12 inches. Japanese sweet flag grass (Acorus spp.) pusillus has slightly shorter, more rigid glossy green leaves, while var. It can be also grown in containers within landscape ponds or other water features. Protection from hot afternoon sun can be beneficial in very hot weather. The Spruce uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience. Acorus gramineus, commonly known as Japanese sweet flag, Japanese rush, grassy-leaved sweet flag, and grass-leaf sweet flag,[1] is a botanical species belonging to the genus Acorus, native to Japan, Korea, and eastern Asia. David Beaulieu is a garden writer with nearly 20 years experience writing about landscaping and over 10 years experience working in nurseries. It is often used along the borders of landscape ponds and other water features. 24 - 36". Feed Japanese sweet flag grass as needed with a slow-release, slow- to medium-rate fertilizer, applied according to the product directions. Japanese sweet flag (Acorus gramineus) is a striking little aquatic plant that tops out at about 12 inches. Japanese sweet flag grass works well as a ground cover in boggy areas, similar to liriope plants. Sign up to get all the latest gardening tips! Acorus calamus, sweet flag grass. It is often used along the borders of landscape ponds and other water features. The plant usually grows in wetlands and shallow water. Plant the small divisions in pots and let them mature before transplanting them into their permanent locations. Click here for more info about Japanese sweet flag. It is a cooperative, slow-spreading plant that attains a width of 2 feet in about five years. The rhizomes are sweetly scented as are the leaves when crushed. The "sweet" label comes from the pleasant, spicy aroma the leaves produce when crushed. This is an aquatic plant, so constant or near-constant contact with water is essential. If the plants are near a pond with fish, be aware of any fertilizer's effect on the water. The plant may not be statuesque, but the golden-yellow grass provides plenty of bright color in soggy garden spots, along streams or pond edges, in semi-shady woodland gardens or nearly any area where the plants moisture requirements are met. 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Although slow-growing, it can be somewhat invasive in ideal conditions. variegatus has longer leaves streaked with yellow.

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